Tasche
© Rüstkammer, Staatliche Kunstsammlungen Dresden, Foto: Jürgen Karpinski
From 30 May 2020 the following museums in the Residenzschloss will be open daily (except Tuesdays) from 11 to 17: Historisches and Neues Grünes Gewölbe, Riesensaal, Paraderäume and Porzellankabinett at the Turmzimmer as well as Türckische Cammer.

Teresa Murak and masterpieces of silk and pearl embroidery

Processes of growth and transformation fascinate Teresa Murak (b. 1949), who focuses on them in her performance-centred work. Murak began her practice in the early 1970s in the context of the neo-avantgarde movement in Poland. Her objects and photographs are material relics and documentations of fundamentally processual actions.

  • Exhibition Site
  • Admission Fees normal 14 €, reduced 10,50 €, under 17 free, Groups (10 persons and more) 12,50 €, Audioguide free

[Translate to English:] Von diesem Anliegen

Through her deliberate use of simple materials of organic origin—soil, sourdough, cloth and, repeatedly, seeds—she ties herself in with the cycle of life, with becoming, growing and vanishing. Testifying to this concern above all are her characteristic “sowings”, almost ritual actions in which she allows cress seeds to germinate on her body using her own body heat. In some cases, she has preserved the resulting shapes, as in the work shown now at the Rüstkammer. In close proximity to the masterfully crafted beadworks and silk embroideries, the hands as a symbol of human creative power are seen in the light of a further creative energy, the energy of nature. To Murak, they refer to an understanding of the body as a medium of a primordial mystery, allowing her to see connections with fertility cults from around the world.

zwei Handschuhe
© Staatliche Kunstsammlungen Dresden, Foto: Thomas Seidel
Teresa Murak, Ohne Titel (Handschuhe), 1975/76

[Translate to English:] Im Dialog mit

In a dialogue with the electoral ornamental textiles and accessories, the differences in the artistic adoption of nature bring out a shared theme. The contemporary artwork arises from the most inconspicuous, simple material, letting the energy of nature take direct effect, while the great liveliness of the 17th-century plant motifs arises from the highly artistic and skillful use of precious silk and an abundance of tiny freshwater pearls.

Tasche
© Rüstkammer, Staatliche Kunstsammlungen Dresden, Foto: Jürgen Karpinski
Jagdtasche mit Seiden- und Perlenstickerei, Hans Erich Friese, Dresden, ca. 1609

[Translate to English:] Die Familie Hoffmann

In March 2018, the Hoffmann family donated their extensive collection of contemporary art, comprising some 1,200 works, to the Staatliche Kunstsammlungen Dresden. A goal for the donated works is to have them enter a dialogue with objects from various museums of the Staatliche Kunstsammlungen Dresden, thereby opening up different perspectives and levels of meaning for both the contemporary and the historical exhibits.

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